Get small in Go present

Among the many cool tools in the Go ecosystem is present, a package for making slide presentations and blog posts. It’s an easy way to make a nice looking HTML5 presentation that can also run live code samples. Keen!

Because it’s so cool, lots of folks use it. Often they publish their slides afterwards. For example, here is a terrific talk by Brad Fitzpatrick from GoCon Tokyo.

The problem is, Go present must have only been used by folks with high-resolution displays so far. When I look at any Go present presentation in my browser, the top gets chopped off. On most slides, this is the title!

screen cap of Go present in smaller browser

That top line is supposed to read, “60% of the time, it works every time….”, but even though I am scrolled all the way to the top, I can’t see it.

This appears to be a typical case of making fixed-size assumptions in HTML. I fiddled with the CSS a bit until I arrived at manipulating the margin-top value. Ten percent was a bit too much

screen cap of Go present with 10% top margin.

but 5% worked pretty well.

screen cap of Go present with 5% top margin.

So, I added the following to my userContent.css file.

/*
 * This is to force "Go present" presentations to fit in my browser.
 */
.slides { margin-top: 5% !important; }

Now all such presentations I encounter (which is a lot lately) are readable in my browser.

Get small in Go present

All yarn gopher

CIMG8021.JPG

Figure 1: All yarn gopher

Here is a knitted Go gopher done with all yarn…no plastic eyes, no plastic nose, no felt teeth. I used the same yarn and needles as before, but I made a few changes.

Body (blue)

I started with Judy’s Magic Cast-On, but you can use any toe-up sock type cast-on. Using 4 DPNs, it divides nicely onto three needles.

CO4
Row 1: [k]
Row 2: [kfb] (8 sts)
Row 3: [k]
Row 4: [kfb] (16 sts)
Row 5: [k]
Row 6: [kfb] (32 sts)
Row 7: [k]
Row 8: [kfb, k7] (36 sts)
Rows 9 - 40: [k]
Row 41: [k2tog, k7] (32 sts)
Row 42: [k]
Row 43: [k2tog] (16 sts)
Row 44: [k]
Row 45: [k2tog] (8 sts)

CIMG8010.JPG

Figure 2: Make eyes before stuffing and closing

Eyes (white)

I did the eyes like the top of the head.

CO4
Row 1: k
Row 2: kfb (8 sts)
Row 3: k
Row 4: kfb (16 sts)
Row 5: k
BO

Use the yarn ends to attach the eyes to the face. Then use black yarn to add the centers of the eyes. I tried to make mine off-center, like in the original drawing, and they came out a little screwy. Eyes are important, so take care here.

Nose (tan)

CO4
Row 1: p
Row 2: k1, m1, k2, m1, k1 (6 sts)
Row 3: p
Row 4: k1, sl1, k1, pss0, k2tog, k1 (4 sts)

Teeth (white)

CO4
Row 1: sl1, p3
Row 2: sl1, k3
Row 3: sl1, p3
BO

Use the yarn ends to attach the teeth to the nose and both of those to the face. Then use black yarn to add the tip of the nose.

CIMG8011.JPG

Figure 3: Attach eyes

CIMG8012.JPG

Figure 4: Attach nose

Ears (blue)

Pick up 4 sts along head
Row 1-4: [k]
Row 5: [k2tog]
Break yarn and bind off, run yarn back to body and inside.

CIMG8013.JPG

Figure 5: Attach ears

CIMG8014.JPG

Figure 6: Use black yarn for the pupils and nose.

I did the arms, legs, and tail the same: four rounds of 4-stitch I-cord.

CIMG8015.JPG

Figure 7: You can attach the arms before closing up.

CIMG8016.JPG

Figure 8: Finish stuffing and close up before attaching the legs and tail.

All yarn gopher

Glenda, the Plan 9 Bunny

CIMG8004.JPG

Figure 1: Finished bunny, with image search in the background

This is my second attempt at Glenda, the Plan 9 bunny. The first one was improvised and then given away, so this time I tried to write down what I was doing.

Gauge hardly matters. I used worsted yarn and 4.5 mm needles.

I used plastic eyes and a plastic nose that clip on. If you don’t have those handy (or if you’re giving the bunny to a baby), you can improvise with black and pink yarn instead.

I save the ends from all of my knitting and normally I use that to stuff toys like this with. But since Glenda is all white, I didn’t want all the assorted colors to show through. So for this project, I used polyester fill from the craft store instead.

Body

I started with Judy’s Magic Cast-On, but you can use any toe-up sock type cast-on. Using 4 DPNs, it divides nicely onto three needles.

CO4
Row 1: k
Row 2: kfb (8 sts)
Row 3: k
Row 4: kfb (16 sts)
Row 5: k
Row 6: kfb (32 sts)
Row 7: k
Row 8: [kfb, k7] (36 sts)
Rows 9-35: k
Row 36: k17, turn
Row 37: sl1, p15, turn
Row 38: sl1, k14, turn
Row 39: sl1, p13, turn
Row 40: sl1, k
Row 41: k18, [k2tog] (27 sts)
STOP! Attach the eyes, nose, and ears before closing up.
Row 42: [k2tog] (14 sts)
Row 43: [k2tog] (7 sts)
Break yarn and run it through these 7 sts twice.

CIMG7982.JPG

Figure 2: Body of bunny (row 41?)

Ears

CO 8 in white
Rows 1-6: k3 white, k2 pink, k3 white
Rows 7-8: k8 white
Row 9: k2tog

CIMG7987.JPG

Figure 3: Ears

Nose

CO 6
Row 1: p
Row 2: sl1, k1, psso, k4, k2tog (4 sts)
Row 3: p1, p2tog, p1
BO

Place 12 mm pink plastic nose at top. Hot glue a small piece of white felt for teeth at bottom. Sew onto body using the tail from binding off.

CIMG7989.JPG

Figure 4: Nose

Finishing

I attached the eyes and nose before stuffing. But I put most of the stuffing in before attaching the ears. I think placement of the ears is important; we’re not making just any cute litte bunny, we’re making Glenda. She’s a little off kilter, so you want to shape her a bit after stuffing and then place the ears just so.

CIMG7990.JPG

Figure 5: Stuff before placing ears?

The legs are going to be formed from those short-rows at the end of the body

CIMG7993.JPG

Figure 6: Form legs by stitching

Make a pom-pom for a tail! You can buy little gizmos to help you make pom-poms, but your fingers work as well.

CIMG7996.JPG

Figure 7: wrap yarn around two fingers

CIMG7997.JPG

Figure 8: Tie off and cut

CIMG7999.JPG

Figure 9: Now trim

Leave yourself a long enough tail to attach the pom-pom with.

CIMG8002.JPG

Figure 10: Finished

Glenda, the Plan 9 Bunny

Go Gopher

CIMG7979.JPG

Figure 1: Finished gopher, with image search in the background

Here is my second attempt at a knitted Go gopher. The first one was improvised and then given away. This time I tried to keep track of what I did as I went along. I had a lot more trouble this time and I’m not as happy with the result. Especially the nose. I might have to rework that. Check back for updates.

Gauge hardly matters. I used worsted yarn and 4.5 mm needles.

I used plastic eyes and a plastic nose that clip on. If you don’t have those handy (or if you’re giving the gopher to a baby), you can improvise with black yarn instead.

I save the ends from all of my knitting and use that to stuff toys like this with. If you don’t have a bag of “yarn ends” handy, you can buy polyester fill at a craft store.

The arms, legs, and tail are I-cord. Nothing could be simpler. It’s just like knitting in the round, only on just two needles. You’re still going around in a circle, but with only four or five stitches per round, it’s not worth it to change needles.

Body

I started with Judy’s Magic Cast-On, but you can use any toe-up sock type cast-on. Using 4 DPNs, it divides nicely onto three needles.

CO6
Row 1: [k]
Row 2: [kfb] (12 sts)         # 4 sts per needle
Row 3: [kfb] (24 sts)         # 8 sts per needle
Row 4: [k]
Row 5: [kfb, k7] (27 sts)     # 9 sts per needle
Row 6: [kfb, k8] (30 sts)     # 10 sts per needle
Row 7: [kfb, k9] (33 sts)     # 11 sts per needle
Row 8: [kfb, k10] (36 sts)    # 12 sts per needle
Row 9-25: [k]                 # about 7 or 8 cm from CO
Row 26: [k2tog, k10] (33 sts)
Row 27: [k2tog, k9] (30 sts)
Row 28: [k2tog, k8] (27 sts)
Row 29: [k2tog, k7] (24 sts)  # about 10 cm
STOP! Assemble and stuff the gopher before finishing.
Row 30: [k2tog] (12 sts)
Bind off (break yarn and run through remaing loops twice)

CIMG7965.JPG

Figure 2: Body after increases, but before decreases (row 25?)

Eyes (white)

I adapted the knit a circle instructions here to make the white disks for the eyes. This is a bit fiddly. The first gopher I did had crocheted eyes that my wife made for me. I wanted to make an “all knit” pattern, so I worked this out, but if you know how to crochet (or if you have a crocheter in the house like I do!), consider doing that instead.

CO 1
Row 1: k1, p1, k1 in the same stitch. (3 sts)
Row 2: Turn the needle and purl across the row.
Row 3: Turn the needle again, kfb all stitches. (6 sts)
Row 4: Divide onto three DPNs, join, and knit around.
Row 5: Kfb all stitches. (12 sts)
Row 6: Knit around.
Row 7: [Kfb, K1] around. (18 sts)
Bind off, leaving a long tail.

Place 9 mm black plastic eyes in centers. Position eyes on body and sew in place with the tail from binding off.

CIMG7967.JPG

Figure 3: Knitted eyes, one with plastic insert.

Nose (tan)

CO 5
Row 1-3: sl1, k4
Break yarn and bind off, leaving a tail to attach with.

Place 12 mm black plastic nose at top. Hot glue a small piece of white felt for teeth at bottom. Sew onto body.

CIMG7969.JPG

Figure 4: Nose with plastic nose inserted and felt teeth glued on.

Ears (blue)

Pick up 4 sts along head
Row 1-4: [k]
Row 5: [k2tog]
Break yarn and bind off, run yarn back to body and inside.

CIMG7971.JPG

Figure 5: Gopher with eyes, nose, and ears.

Arms and Legs (tan)

CO5 
Row 1-4: knit I-cord
Row 5: k2tog, k1, k2tog
BO and run tail down through center of I-cord to the bottom.

CIMG7975.JPG

Figure 6: You can stuff the gopher after attaching the arms, but then close up before attaching the legs and tail.

Tail (tan)

CO4 
Row 1-4: knit I-cord
BO and run tail down through center of I-cord to the bottom.

CIMG7977.JPG

Figure 7: With the body stuffed and closed, attaching the legs and tail is a bit fiddly, but not too bad.

Go Gopher